1. Oenothera

Well, Oenothera is a genus of about 145 species of herbaceous flowering plants native to the Americas. It is the type genus of the family Onagraceae. Common names include evening primrose, suncups, and sundrops. They are not closely related to the true primroses (genus Primula). The sun-drop usually found in gardens is mistakenly called “evening primrose” some Oenothera do bloom at night, but not thee. They resemble large, spread open buttercups and bloom in early summer, with some repeat bloom as summer goes on O. pilosella however sometimes labeled O. fruticosa is the weedy variety gardeners tend to complain to plant if you want a lot of sunny yellow in your garden and you want it quickly, O. missourensis has larger flowers, grows low to the ground, and is not a spreader. Fyrverkeri is long blooming. Moreover all sun loving and tolerant of dry, infertile soil and those that enjoy your garden too much can easily be weeded out, for they are shallow rooted. Try them in a spot where you want a lot of color quickly.

Oenothera is a genus of about 145 species of herbaceous flowering plants native to the Americas.
Oenothera is a genus of about 145 species of herbaceous flowering plants native to the Americas.

2. Veronica Speedwell

Veronicas are normally blue but sometime lavender, pink or white. The flowers are spiky and range in height from four feet to a few inches. Bloom period varies from early to late summer Veronica spicata “Blue Peter” grows up to two feet and bloom in mid-summer. Icicle is white and a long bloomer, “Red Fox” is medium height and fairly early. V. prostrata heavenly blue is low and mat forming and early blooming. V. incana is same but has a striking white leaf as well as blue flowers. Moreover these plants like sun but will take some shade. They need adequate moisture but good drainage as well. The soil should be moderately fertile. They are easily divided in spring or fall. Cutting back spent blooms may encourage red bloom.

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Veronicas are normally blue but sometime lavender, pink or white.
Veronicas are normally blue but sometime lavender, pink or white.

3. Yarrow or Milfoil

Several people are familiar with the wild white yarrow with its flat clusters of flowers, but most garden specimens are yellow, and some are pink or red. All have ferny leaves, sometimes with a grayish cast. They are easy to grow and bloom for a long time in summer. Most hybrids are varieties of Achillea millefolium or A. filipendulina, “Moonshine” is a pale yellow with gray leaves and grows up to two feet. “Coronation Gold” is bright yellow with greener leaves, and grows to three feet. “Fire King” is two feet and pinkish red. “Gold Plate” is among the tallest. A.tomentosa is a very pleasing low variety that forms a mat of whitish leaves and has flowers less than a foot tall. It is nice in the rock garden or at the front of the border. Yarrows are sun loving and drought resistant. Some are rather spread and need to be divided frequently. All in fact benefit by division every few years in fall or early spring.

Several people are familiar with the wild white yarrow with its flat clusters of flowers, but most garden specimens are yellow, and some are pink or red.
Several people are familiar with the wild white yarrow with its flat clusters of flowers, but most garden specimens are yellow, and some are pink or red.

4. Shasta Daisy

Shasta daisy or Chrysanthemum x superbum (C. Maximum) are always white, but can be tier single or double, tall short. They generally bloom for a long time in summer, especially if the flower stems are cut, and are a good white accent. “Alaska” and “Polaris” are among the hardiest tall varieties both the single and “Marconi is a double variety. Little Miss Muffet is a single that grows about a foot tall. Well, though to provide rich moist, well-drained soil. IN hot climates provide light shade. Pinching the stems in early summer will make the tall varieties bushier. Clumps are sometimes short-lived; established ones respond well to division.

Shasta daisy or Chrysanthemum x superbum (C. Maximum) are always white, but can be tier single or double, tall short.
Shasta daisy or Chrysanthemum x superbum (C. Maximum) are always white, but can be tier single or double, tall short.

5. Bugbane

This woodland plant, native to the eastern United States, is not well known but really a delight to grow. Its flowers tall fuzzy white spikes. The leaves are attractive and fernlike rather like that of astilbe. Cimicifuga racemosa grows five to six feet tall, sometimes even taller and flowers in mid to late summer and flowers in mid to late summer sometimes earlier. C. simplex grows about three feet tall and blooms in fall. Moreover both species like part shade and moist, woodsy soil, but C. Simplex will do well in full sun. Division is not necessary but the stems often need to be stake up to where the flower begins.

This woodland plant, native to the eastern United States, is not well known but really a delight to grow. Its flowers tall fuzzy white spikes.
This woodland plant, native to the eastern United States, is not well known but really a delight to grow. Its flowers tall fuzzy white spikes.

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Originally posted 2015-07-13 00:47:06.

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