In Arizona, almost 1,000 years ago, the ancient Cohonina people created Keyhole Sink. This is the canyon in the shape of a keyhole near Williams, in Kaibab National Forest. The seasonal waterfalls flow into the Keyhole Sink canyon. Keyhole Sink also called Box Canyon easily accessed by foot from unpaved pathway famous with Keyhole Sink Trail. It will take 20 to 2 minutes from Williams to the trailhead.
The archaeologist believes this area was used as a sort of sacred rest stop for hunters and clan initiations. Thus, research suggests, the surrounding of 15 miles are remnants of pit house foundations. The carved petroglyphs volcanic basalt, include lizards, frogs, deer, snakes, and amorphous pictures.
These images were made by the Cohonina, who lived in this place from around 700 to 1100. These petroglyphs were badly affected by severe weathered in Aug 2010 vandals caused, however, they have been restored, but the damage is still evident. Now the petroglyphs are monitored through hidden cameras.

Keyhole Sink Trail

Keyhole Sink Trail is 1.3 miles moderately trafficked out and back trail features stunning wildflowers and birds sounds. The trail is good for all skill levels, as you can use this trail with your dogs. The trail is well marked and offers few activity options and it is best used from March to November. You can take your kids onto the trail, which is not a difficult option. Sego lilies near the trailhead and water in the sink.
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The petroglyphs are pretty worn off. Moreover, you need to be careful of bees! They like the mud during monsoon season and are pretty much everywhere. Make sure to check out the Hieroglyphs! Don’t forget to wear good mud boots if going in monsoon.
One of the deer petroglyphs is a remarkable depiction of a deer herd entering the canyon. You have to keep a sharp eye, as this site is an excellent place to encounter wildlife. Also, respect the irreplaceable traces of the past that you find along with it. Hence, leave them uninterrupted so that others may enjoy them as you have.
Waterfall at Keyhole Sink on the Williams Ranger District of Kaibab National Forest. Photo Credit - U.S. Forest Service, Southwestern Region, Kaibab National Forest.
Waterfall at Keyhole Sink on the Williams Ranger District of Kaibab National Forest. Photo Credit – U.S. Forest Service, Southwestern Region, Kaibab National Forest.
Water flowing in Keyhole Sink, February 2017. Landscape above the canyon walls is also visible, showing the abrupt nature of the geologic sink.
Water flowing in Keyhole Sink, February 2017. The landscape above the canyon walls showing the abrupt nature of the geologic sink.

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You have to keep a sharp eye, as this site is an excellent place to encounter wildlife.
You have to keep a sharp eye, as this site is an excellent place to encounter wildlife.
The carved petroglyphs volcanic basalt, include lizards, frogs, deer, snakes, and amorphous pictures.
The carved petroglyphs volcanic basalt, include lizards, frogs, deer, snakes, and amorphous pictures.
View of the Keyhole Sink Petroglyphs on the morning of 7 November 2010
View of the Keyhole Sink Petroglyphs
Petroglyphs located in Keyhole Sink on the Williams Ranger District of the Kaibab National Forest. Photo credit to U.S. Forest Service, Southwestern Region, Kaibab National Forest.
Petroglyphs located in Keyhole Sink Photo credit – U.S. Forest Service, Southwestern Region, Kaibab National Forest.

Source – 1, 2,

Read More – The Mysterious Stones of Pokaini Forest
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