Roy Collins, an Australian photographer uses his digital camera to highlight the short-lived beauty of ocean waves as they surge and break in cascades of sea foam. Roy Collins swims out to sea every day, wanting to capture the natural moments when sun-dappled water crests into detectable shapes just like mountains and hills. Moreover, Frozen in time, each suspended wave takes on the appearance of a glass sculpture shot through with shining undertones of aqua and emerald.

Therefore, when you look at his stunning images it is extremely hard to believe that Roy Collins, who is colorblind, only started pursuing photography in 2007 after working as a coal miner for years. Although he is unable to work in the mines any longer because of a knee injury, he swapped his underground world with an underwater paradise filled with sunshine, surfing, and remarkable swells of water. He says, I’ve been working in an underground coal mine longer than I have been making photographs, but my original memories are of being in the ocean, so I predict it’s a full circle of influence. I will tell you what; however, nothing feels better than being in the sea after breaking rocks and avoiding being crushed by collapsing tunnels for twelve hours straight. It’s a complete freedom. Collins’s photographs can be seen in Found at Sea, his newest coffee table book described as “a visual journey capturing the brief moments of a wave’s journey to dissipation.” Source: My Modernmet

Ray Collins: Website | Facebook | Instagram1Sea Monster - Ray Collins34

"I especially love shooting when approaching fronts are forecasted. I really like the dark, moody and powerful images with dramatic lighting," photographer Ray Collins told weather.com. (Ray Collins)

“I especially love shooting when approaching fronts are forecasted. I really like the dark, moody and powerful images with dramatic lighting,” photographer Ray Collins told weather.com. (Ray Collins)

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